Microsoft releases printable Windows 10 key shortcut list

Categories Microsoft, NewsPosted on

Well do you know your Windows key shortcuts in Windows 10? Just go through my previous post for handy keyboard shortcuts on Windows 10. If you need a cheat sheet, Microsoft has just published one that you can download and print.

While Microsoft already offers online documentation on keyboard shortcuts, the format of the page can be difficult to sift through. Fortunately, Microsoft now offers an offline version in Word .DOCX format

Thanks to Mary Jo Foley for spotting it.

There are 42 shortcuts in total, mostly dealing with window management, the Start menu, the Task view, and Cortana. Keep in mind the list only includes Windows key shortcuts, not shortcuts involving Ctrl or Alt.

You can grab the official document straight from Microsoft. Also the Office Web Apps version

Windows 10 – Keyboard Shortcuts

Categories Microsoft, NewsPosted on

Friends,

In this blog post, I’d like to share a list of Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts with you.

Windows 10 has been launched and it is running on over 70 million devices as when the post is being written. This post lists many new keyboard shortcuts that have been included in Windows 10 and also the ones that pre-exist on Windows devices.

Here’s my list of Windows 10 shortcuts, and – in addition – some of my favorite “old but gold” shortcuts known from previous versions of Windows:

New Keyboard Shortcuts in Windows 10

  • WIN + A : Open Action Center
  • WIN + G : Open Game Bar
  • WIN + I : Open Settings “Trusted Windows Store” App
  • WIN + Q : Search using voice in Cortana
  • WIN + S : Search using text in Cortana
  • WIN + X : Open Context menu associated with Start button
  • WIN + Print Screen : Capture Screenshot of current window and save it in Pictures folder
  • WIN + Ctrl + D : Create new Virtual Desktop
  • WIN + Ctrl + Left / WIN + Ctrl + Right : Switch between Virtual Desktops
  • WIN + Ctrl + F4 : Close Current Virtual Desktop
  • WIN + TAB : Open Task View
  • WIN + Left Key / WIN + Right Key : Snap Windows to Left/Right
  • WIN + Up Key / WIN + Down Key : Snap Windows to Up/Down

Existing Keyboard shortcuts in Windows 10

  • WIN + B : Show Hidden Icons in Task bar
  • WIN + D : Show Desktop
  • WIN + E : File Explorer
  • WIN + H : Open Share Bar
  • WIN + K : Open Connect Bar
  • WIN + L : Lock User
  • WIN + P : Project Screen
  • WIN + R : Open Run Box

I’m pretty sure there are much more keyboard shortcuts you can use to speed up your work with Windows 10. If you experience new ones, please let me know! I will try to keep the above list up to date.

Hope the shortcuts help you. Keep learning and sharing.

Visual Studio Code – A Free Cross-Platform Code Editor

Categories Visual StudioPosted on

Code Editing. Redefined.

Code

Introducing Visual Studio Code, a new, free, cross-platform code editor for building modern web and cloud applications on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows

Microsoft announced the launch of Visual Studio Code, a lightweight cross-platform code editor for writing modern web and cloud applications that will run on OS X, Linux and Windows at the //Build developer conference

At its Build developer conference, Microsoft announced the launch of Visual Studio Code, a lightweight cross-platform code editor for writing modern web and cloud applications that will run on OS X, Linux and Windows. You can now download it here.

This marks the first time that Microsoft offers developers a true cross-platform code editor. The full Visual Studio is still Windows-only, but today’s announcement shows the company’s commitment to supporting other platforms.

VSCode is folder and file based. You can open a folder and work on its files. No project file. No solution file. Just grab the code folder and go. When there is a project context, such as with ASP.NET 5, and you open a folder (with an ASP.NET 5 project), VSCode detects the project context.

Visual Studio Code offers developers built-in support for multiple languages and as Microsoft noted in today’s Build keynote, the editor will feature rich code assistance and navigation for all of these languages. JavaScript, TypeScript, Node.js and ASP.NET 5 developers will also get a set of additional tools.

The editor features all of the standard tools you would expect from a modern code editor, including syntax highlighting, customizable keyboard bindings, bracket matching and snippets. It also works with Git out of the box and

You can also follow Visual Studio Code on Twitter at @code.

Installing

Read the docs and see the links below for more details on the prerequisites and how to install and get up and running with VSCode.

  1. Get started
  2. Download Visual Studio Code

Top Features

  1. Debugging – awesome, fast, and easy debugging of server side JavaScript and and C#
  2. Intellisense – C#, TypeScript and even for JavaScript and JSON … not to mention autocomplete and hints
  3. Git integration – super helpful to be able to integrate with git, show diffs, stage, commit, clean
  4. Refactoring – tons of features that make refactoring easy and fast

I like VSCode because it’s super-fast and provides some rich development features (code completion, navigation, deployment, debugging, Git, task running).

At-last i shall say  It’s fast editing experience is similar to what you get with brackets, Sublime while it’s debugging and integration experience is similar to what you get with Visual Studio.

Youtube

Channel 9 – Deep Dive into Visual Studio Code